5 Depression and Obesity Links You Need To Know

Depression and Obesity – What You Need to Know

Why does Hashi Mashi Diet + Training focus on alleviating depression and obesity?

The most straightforward answer is because those have been my two most mortal enemies.

Depression and obesity have plagued me from an early age.

As a result, I have spent most of my life battling the consequences of both.

So, when I found a system that helped both at the same time, I want you to know about it, just in case you are dealing with obesity and depression as well.

The more complicated answer is something that I have always believed in but never had much evidence to prove, mainly that depression and obesity are scientifically linked.

If you are suffering from depression, there is a good chance that you are also overweight or will become obese.

And likewise, as you experience an increase in obesity, the more likely it is that you are at risk of developing depression.

Most diet and exercise plans are for helping you lose weight or get into shape.

Few that I know of speak about helping depression, a silent and hidden killer of men.

Common Risk Factors

Think about it; obesity and depression share common risk factors, such as:

It is clear that depression is one of the risk factors for obesity, and vice-versa, obesity is a risk factor of depression.

So you will not be surprised to learn that you could help both at the same time with the same program.

depression and obesity links
Sorrowing Old Man Oil Painting by Vincent Van Gogh 1890, France — Current Location Kröller-Müller Museum Otterlo Netherlands

Depression and Obesity Have An Unusual Relationship

And it does not seem fair.

One partner (obesity) gets praise in the public eye, and the other (diagnosed with depression) is hidden from the masses as much as possible.

When a person can overcome obesity, just about any major media outlet that you can think of will celebrate the story. Ordinary people receive a hero’s welcomes when they get rid of their excess fat.

And applauding recovery from obesity is well deserved, because that person is lighter and more disease resistant, and so are the people around them happier.

We all feel better around healthy people.

Depression, though, on the other hand, is rarely discussed.

And indeed, how many celebrated recoveries from depression can you think of that are extolled in the media?

And if a person cannot overcome obesity, they are still not shunned.

Fat shaming is not acceptable in the United States, and nor should it be.

But, taking antidepressants or being unable to overcome depression is not treated in the same way.

Depression is a liability in every way you can think possible, and people do not want to admit they suffer from it, nor do others want to talk about it.

As a result, in major Cities where isolation and loneliness are rampant, so are mental health counselors.

Who else will give a person suffering from depression the time of day?

Or, if you are involved in a court case, for example, obesity will not be held against a parent, but depression will be.

Just being on antidepressants is enough for a judge to assume that he or she is a danger to their children, and therefore not fit to have custody.

Obesity and Depression Links

A new study at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) confirms the relationship between obesity and depression, specifically abdominal obesity, which shows an increased risk for cancer and cardiovascular disease.

“We found that in a sample study of young adults for 15 years, those who started out reporting high levels of depression gained weight at a faster rate than others in the study. 

On the other hand, participants who began overweight did not lead to changes in depression,” said UAB Assistant Professor of Sociology Belinda Needham, Ph.D.

The study appears in the June issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

“Our study is important because if you are interested in controlling obesity, and ultimately eliminating the risk of obesity-related diseases, then it makes sense to treat people’s depression,” said Needham, who teaches in the UAB Department of Sociology and Social Work.

“It’s another reason to take depression seriously and not to think about it just in terms of mental health, but to also think about the physical consequences of mental health problems.”

Relationship of Depression and Abdominal Obesity

A new study at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) confirms the relationship between obesity and depression, specifically abdominal obesity, which has been linked to an increased risk for cancer and cardiovascular disease.

“We found that in a sample of young adults during a 15-year period, those who started out reporting high levels of depression gained weight at a faster rate than others in the study, but starting out overweight did not lead to changes in depression,” said UAB Assistant Professor of Sociology Belinda Needham, Ph.D.

The study appears in the June issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

“Our study is important because if you are interested in controlling obesity, and ultimately eliminating the risk of obesity-related diseases, then it makes sense to treat people’s depression,” said Needham, who teaches in the UAB Department of Sociology and Social Work.

“It’s another reason to take depression seriously and not to think about it just in terms of mental health, but to also think about the physical consequences of mental health problems.”

Waist Circumference and Depression

CARDIA study scientists weighed and measured the waist circumference and BMI of study participants.

Health professionals measured the waist circumference to the nearest half centimeter.

CARDIA researchers also asked study participants in years five, 10, 15, and 20 to rank their level of depression.

“Looking at the CARDIA sample data, we found that everyone, as a whole, gained weight during the 15 years that we examined,” said Needham.

“However, the people who started out reporting high levels of depression increased in abdominal obesity and BMI at a faster rate than those who reported fewer symptoms of depression at year five.

In year five, the waist circumference of the high-depression group was about 1.6 centimeters greater than those who reported low depression.

By year 20, the waist circumference of the high-depression group was about 2.6 centimeters higher than those who reported lower levels of depression.

“In contrast, an initial higher BMI and waist circumference did not influence the rate of change in depressive symptoms over time,” she said.

Depression and Obesity Complications are Inextricably Linked

Depression and Obesity Complications are Inextricably Linked. Discover the Most Powerful Exercises to Fight Depression and Obesity Today.

Infographic Credit © 2006 www.ObesityModel.com

5 Depression and Obesity Links You Need to Know

1. The hormone which links obesity and depression is cortisol, a stress hormone that becomes elevated due to higher levels of abdominal obesity.

2. This study shows that higher levels of abdominal obesity are directly related to higher levels of depression.

3. Get the right habits to deal with either depression or obesity, and you will likely manage the other much more effectively.

4. Needham examined data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study, a longitudinal study of 5,115 men and women ages 18-30 that aimed to identify the precursors of cardiovascular disease.

Needham studied the data to test whether body mass index (BMI) — body weight divided by the square of one’s height — and waist circumference were associated with increases in depression or whether depression was associated with changes in BMI and waist circumference during a specific period of time.

5. Needham said there had been reports showing that cortisol, a stress hormone, is related to depression and abdominal obesity.

“So, there is reason to suspect that people who are depressed would have higher levels of abdominal obesity versus other parts of the body because of elevated cortisol,” she said.

Fat and Depressed

How many times have you heard the phrase – “Fat and Depressed”?

Now we know why; because abdominal obesity elevates the stress hormone cortisol, which in turn triggers depression or the risk of depression.

More studies are needed to determine the underlying causes for weight gain among those who reported being depressed, Needham said.

Depression and Obesity – Final Thoughts

Once you get obesity under control, you have a good chance of preventing or managing depression.

If you learn the most powerful exercises and habits to lose weight, you will also be learning the best lifestyle practices and physical activities to fight depression.

You now know that someone who suffers from obesity is under incredible stress and the risk of depression.

If you are or you know someone who is, help them by referring them to resources that can help, this is the reason that HashiMashi.com exists, to help you make an end to obesity and if need be, manage depression without antidepressants.

Stumbling On a Way to Treat Obesity and Depression

In a new york city deli at midnight, I stumbled upon a cure for obesity. Little did I know that this same plan would help me manage depression without antidepressants.

Anyone struggling with the side effects of antidepressants needs to know that there is another way.

I hope this plan will be useful to you or someone for whom you care.

If you can help someone who is suffering from either depression or obesity, you are a hero.

At that time, my waist circumference was near 50 inches before I began to practice the remarkable benefits of:

After only ten months of this practice, what I call the Hashi Mashi plan, my waist was 31 inches, and I was feeling better in my mind as well.

The study above gives you the scientific data for something which you might have always felt to be true.

What’s Next

Obesity and depression are two of the most common and dangerous health issues in the world today.

And you now know that a lifestyle that leads to obesity increase, will lead to depression increase.

The first step is to use the simplest guide for weight loss:

Along with this easy system:

Last, start an exercise program that can work wonders to boost your mood:

Related Posts:

What do you think the best way is to treat depression and obesity?


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. B. L. Needham, E. S. Epel, N. E. Adler, C. Kiefer. Trajectories of Change in Obesity and Symptoms of Depression: The CARDIA Study. American Journal of Public Health, 2010; 100 (6): 1040 DOI: 10.2105/AJPH.2009.172809

Cite This Page:

The University of Alabama at Birmingham. “Link between depression, abdominal obesity confirmed by a new study.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 June 2010.

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